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Marvel’s Promise on ‘Deadpool & Wolverine’: No Prior Knowledge Required?

Recently, I had a rather intriguing experience at the cinema. Just minutes before “Dune: Part Two” began, my close friend confided in me that he hadn’t seen the first part of this science fiction saga. Throughout the movie, I could almost see the giant question marks hovering above his head, and his ultimate verdict was, “Not bad, but unnecessarily complicated.” In other words, he understandably grasped little of the plot of “Dune 2”. This brings us to a significant issue with Marvel.

Marvel Cinematic Universe’s Expansive Library

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) now boasts 33 feature films, making it the most successful film series ever. It’s designed in such a way that the series on Disney Plus and the blockbuster movies in cinemas are interconnected to varying degrees. This not only keeps audiences hooked, wanting to keep up with the storyline and not miss out on anything, but it also introduces a major drawback for the MCU.

At some point, after missing one or two MCU movies in cinemas, cancelling Disney Plus, or simply lacking the time or inclination to binge-watch the new Marvel series, I felt a distinct sensation: I was no longer part of it; I couldn’t keep up anymore.

Personal Marvel Fatigue

My last Marvel movie was “Spider-Man: No Way Home.” Overwhelmed by the excessive fan service, I decided to take a break from Marvel. Thus, I have not kept up with the latest developments about which version of the heroes is active in which universe of the multiverse. The MCU has become, for me, a jumble of countless dimensions, timelines, and alternate realities. And now, Deadpool and Wolverine are entering the scene.

The Deadpool & Wolverine Experience

The upcoming clash of these two eccentric brawlers will likely draw me back to the cinema. Director Shawn Levy assures that no prior knowledge is needed to enjoy “Deadpool & Wolverine,” the 34th film of the MCU, set to premiere on July 25, 2024. As a Marvel representative, he guarantees that this will not negatively affect the cinematic experience for those not up-to-date. Despite this assurance, I find it hard to believe.

The trailer for “Deadpool & Wolverine” alone was chaotic and packed with Easter eggs and hints. It even spoiled the death of literally the biggest Avenger. I will watch “Deadpool & Wolverine” without knowing what happened in “Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness,” the series “Secret Invasion” with Samuel L. Jackson, “Ant-Man 3,” or the major flop “The Marvels.” If I leave the cinema with as many question marks as my friend did at “Dune 2,” “Deadpool & Wolverine” might be my last Marvel film for a long time. If the promise of no required prior knowledge is not fulfilled, then as a viewer, I will feel overlooked.